Easy Roasted Carrots And Green Beans

This Easy Roasted Carrots and Green Beans recipe is a simple yet flavorful dish that makes a perfect side dish for any meal. This recipe is a good choice if you have diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 1 or 2, and/or high cholesterol.

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Roasted carrots and green beans

Roasting the vegetables brings out their natural sweetness and enhances their flavor. This dish is easy to make, requiring just a few basic ingredients like olive oil, Italian seasoning, black pepper, garlic, and salt. The combination of the tender, sweet carrots and the crunchy green beans creates a satisfying texture and a delicious flavor profile. Roasted Carrots and Green Beans is a healthy and nutritious dish that is packed with vitamins and minerals, making it a great addition to any balanced diet.

This roasted carrots and green beans recipe is diabetes friendly

Each serving of this recipe contains 7 grams of fiber, which is more than 20% of daily recommended value. Fiber helps to regulate blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity, lowering the risk of heart disease. Fiber also promotes satiety, which can aid in weight management, which is another important factor in diabetes management.

Aside from being high in fiber, this recipe is also low in calories (151 calories per serving) and total carbohydrates (20 grams per serving), which means that the likelihood of a blood sugar spike after eating this recipe is very low. 

This is a cholesterol friendly recipe

A high fiber intake is linked to better cholesterol management and heart health. Fiber, especially soluble fiber, found in foods such as oats, beans, fruits, and green vegetables is especially beneficial for cholesterol control.

When soluble fiber is digested, it forms a gel-like substance in the digestive tract that binds to cholesterol and prevents it from being absorbed into the bloodstream. This can help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol levels in the blood, lowering the risk of heart disease.

Aside from being high in fiber, this recipe has very little saturated fat (1 gram per serving), has no dietary cholesterol and has a good amount of monounsaturated fat (5 gram per serving), which makes it a great choice of managing cholesterol.

This recipe is a great choice for CKD stage 1 or 2

 If you have CKD stage 1 or 2, it is recommended that you eat a low-protein, low-sodium, high-potassium diet. 

Each serving of this recipe has only 3 grams of protein, 96 mg of sodium, and 629 mg of potassium, making it a great choice of CKD stage 1 or 2.

Ingredients

Vegetables: Choose fresh carrots and green beans. I prefer to peel the carrots, but if you want you can leave the skin on and just srcub and wash the carrots to remove any dirt.

Seasoning: I have used olive oil, garlic, Italian seasoning, salt, and black pepper. Add some chili flakes if you prefer your vegetables to be a bit more spicy.

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Roasted carrots and green beans – Ingredients

How to make this recipe

  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Line a baking tray with aluminum foil.
  • Wash and pat dry the vegetables. Trim the ends of the green beans and cut in halves. Cut carrots into three-inch pieces and then cut these pieces into sticks.
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Cut the carrots into matchstick shap and trim the green beans
  • Mix the green beans, carrots, olive oil, garlic, Italian seasoning, salt, and pepper in a large bowl until everything is well coated.
  • Spread out the vegetables in a single layer on the prepared baking tray to avoid crowding them.
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Mix vegetables with seasoning and spread in a single layer on a baking tray
  • Bake the vegetables in the oven for 20-25 minutes or until the vegetables are tender and caramelized. Remove from the oven and serve.
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Roasted carrots and green beans in a bowl
Roasted carrots and green beans recipe card

Roasted Carrots And Green Beans

8f7236c9626d7dcca9cca39f75b7f03fArchana Singh, PhD
This Easy Roasted Carrots and Green Beans recipe is a simple yet flavorful dish that makes a perfect side dish for any meal. This recipe is a good choice if you have diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 1 or 2, and/or high cholesterol.
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Course Main Course, Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 4
Calories 151 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 lb carrots peeled
  • 1 lb green beans
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp Italian seasoning
  • 3 cloves garlic peeled and minced
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper freshly ground

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Line a baking tray with aluminum foil.
  • Wash and pat dry the vegetables. Trim the ends of the green beans and cut in halves. Cut carrots into three-inch pieces and then cut these pieces into sticks.
  • Mix the green beans, carrots, olive oil, garlic, Italian seasoning, salt, and pepper in a large bowl until everything is well coated.
  • Spread out the vegetables in a single layer on the prepared baking tray to avoid crowding them.
  • Bake the vegetables in the oven for 20-25 minutes or until the vegetables are tender and caramelized. Remove from the oven and serve.

Nutrition

Calories: 151kcalCarbohydrates: 20gProtein: 3gFat: 8gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 5gSodium: 96mgPotassium: 629mgFiber: 7gSugar: 9gPhosphorus: 88mg
Keyword Diabetes Friendly, Low Cholesterol, Roasted carrots and green beans
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Are carrots good for diabetes

Carrots are a good food choice for people with diabetes for several reasons. Here are some of the key reasons why carrots can be beneficial for diabetes:

High in fiber: Carrots are a good source of fiber, which can help regulate blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity. Fiber also helps you feel full for longer, which can be helpful for managing weight.

Rich in antioxidants: Carrots are rich in antioxidants, including beta-carotene, which can help reduce the risk of complications associated with diabetes, such as cardiovascular disease.

Low in calories: Carrots are a low-calorie food, which makes them a good option for people with diabetes who need to manage their weight.

Overall, incorporating carrots as part of a healthy and balanced diet can be beneficial for people with diabetes. It is important to eat carrots in moderation and as part of a well-balanced meal plan.

Are green beans good for diabetes

Green beans are a healthy vegetable that can be beneficial for people with diabetes for several reasons:

Low in carbohydrates: Green beans are low in carbohydrates and have a low glycemic index, which means that they do not cause a rapid increase in blood sugar levels. This makes them a good food choice for people with diabetes who need to manage their blood sugar levels.

High in fiber: Green beans are a good source of fiber, which can help regulate blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity. Fiber also helps you feel full for longer, which can be helpful for managing weight.

Rich in vitamins and minerals: Green beans are a good source of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, vitamin K, and folate. These nutrients are important for overall health and can help reduce the risk of complications associated with diabetes, such as heart disease.

Low in calories: Green beans are a low-calorie food, which makes them a good option for people with diabetes who need to manage their weight.

Do Carrots Lower Blood Sugar

Carrots are a healthy addition to any diet, but it’s important to keep in mind that they do include some carbohydrates and natural sugars. However, as compared to other starchy or sugary foods, carrots have a comparatively low amount of sugar. Carrots also include dietary fiber, which may reduce the rate at which sugars are absorbed into the system.

Each 100 grams of carrots, has about 10 grams of carbs. These carbs are healthy as they are made up of about a third (28%) of dietary fibers.

So if you ever throught of this question: are carrots bad for diabetes?, you have your answer: Carrots are not bad for diabetes.

Do Carrots Spike Insulin

Carbohydrates in carrots, like those in many other vegetables, have the ability to cause the body to produce more insulin. But by how much and how fast. It’s important to note that Carrots have a lot of dietary fiber (about 28% of the carbs in carrots is in the form of dietary fiber,) which helps slow down the digestion and uptake of carbohydrates. This could help prevent blood sugar levels from rising too quickly.

The GI of a raw carrot is 16 while the GI for carrots that have been cooked is between 32 and 49. Two small raw carrots have a glycemic load of about 8. So, since carrots have a low glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), hence they are thought to have a small effect on insulin levels.

The glycemic index shows how quickly a food with carbohydrates boosts blood sugar levels. The glycemic load takes into account both the glycemic index and the amount of carbohydrates in a serving of food. Carrots have a low glycemic index and a low glycemic load, which means they don’t affect blood sugar levels as much as foods with a high GI or GL.

Other diabetes friendly recipes
Vegetarian chili white bean
Baked Mexican cabbage
Low carb balsamic green beans with hazelnuts
Spinach arugula salad – Low carb | heart healthy

Archana Singh, PhD

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