Kidney Friendly Low Potassium Turkey Sausage Patties

If you want to make a light and juicy, Kidney Friendly Low Potassium Turkey Sausage Patties, this is the recipe for you!

Kidney friendly low potassium turkey sausage patties-1

These patties are a staple in our household throughout the year because they are so simple to make. All you need is ground turkey and some spices to make these sausage patties. They have a juiciness to them, a moist texture, and a robust flavor. The fact that these turkey patties are lower in fat and calories than other breakfast turkey sausage patties makes them an even better option.

Why is this a kidney friendly recipe

This recipe has just the right amount of sodium, protein, potassium, and phosphorus, which is why it works great for any stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

This recipe has a moderately low amount of sodium, with 175 mg of sodium per serving. If you have chronic kidney disease (CKD), one of the micronutrients that you need to pay particular attention to is sodium. This is due to the fact that salt consumption is the primary contributor to the development of high blood pressure, or hypertension, which happens to be the leading cause of the development of CKD.

The kidneys perform the function of a filter by eliminating waste from the body. When you have CKD, regardless of the stage you are at, you lose the ability to eliminate nitrogenous protein waste from the foods or beverages you ingest because your kidneys are no longer functioning properly. This waste starts to build up in your blood, which can lead to major health consequences if left untreated. If you have any stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), cutting back on the amount of protein you eat can help you preserve kidney function since it will leave your kidneys with less waste to process.

Your requirements for protein will be determined by the severity of your kidney disease. Animal products such as chicken, turkey, pork, eggs, dairy products, etc. should account for half of your protein intake, while plant foods such as beans, lentils, tofu, etc. should make up the remainder.

Proteins that come from plants are considered to be of lower biological value because they don’t have all of the essential amino acids. On the other hand, proteins that come from animals are thought to have a higher biological value because they have all of the essential amino acids. However, proteins that come from animals also make more nitrogenous waste than proteins that come from plants, which can be hard on the kidneys.

If you have CKD stages 1 or 2 and eat 2000 calories a day, you should eat 50 grams of protein every day. About 25 grams of this protein can come from animals. Given this, you can safely eat up to 1.5 servings of this recipe each day.

Patients with CKD stages 3, 4, and 5 who do not receive dialysis should eat 35 grams of protein every day if their diet has 2000 calories. The protein from animals can account for up to 17.5 grams of this total. This means that if you have CKD stages 3, 4, or 5 (without dialysis), you can eat 1 serving of this recipe per day to meet all your requirements for animal protein.

Dialysis patients typically have an increased protein requirement. If you are on dialysis and eat a typical diet of 2000 calories, you are supposed to eat 90 grams of protein every day. It is recommended that 45 grams of this come from proteins derived from animals. This means you can safely consume up to 2.5 servings of this recipe to meet all your protein requirements from animal sources.

About half of people with moderate or advanced CKD have hyperkalemia, which means they have too much potassium in their blood, and they need to limit how much potassium they eat. Each serving of this recipe contains 204 mg of potassium, which is fairly low and makes these patties a great choice if you are on a potassium-restricted diet. Remember that you don’t need to restrict your potassium intake unless your healthcare provider has asked you to do so.

Many patients with CKD are on a phosphorus-restricted diet. If your blood phosphorus levels are higher than normal, then limiting your intake of animal-based protein is a great way to reduce your phosphorus intake. The main reason for this is that animal proteins naturally have more phosphorus than plant-based proteins. The second reason is that the body absorbs phosphorus from animal sources better than it does from plant-based sources of protein.

This recipe contains 129 mg of phosphorus per serving. This is a moderate amount of phosphorus, and about 40–60% of this phosphorus will be absorbed by your body.

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Kidney friendly low sodium turkey sausage patties – great for CKD

Why is this a heart healthy recipe

Making just a few changes to your diet can reduce your chances of developing heart diseases such as a heart attack or stroke. Eat a diet that is rich in vegetables and monounsaturated fats, and cut down on your consumption of processed foods and red meats. Keep your intake of saturated fat and dietary cholesterol low, and pay attention to your sodium intake.

This recipe is low in calories and has only 111 calories per serving. It is also low in total fat (5 grams per serving), saturated fat (1 gram per serving), cholesterol (44 mg per serving), and sodium (45 mg per serving). Overall, this recipe is a good choice if you want to keep your heart healthy.

Why is this a diabetes friendly recipe

This recipe is diabetes-friendly because it’s mostly made from lean ground turkey, egg whites, and some herbs. Turkey is high in protein and does not contain a lot of carbohydrates. Since this recipe has negligible carbohydrates, you will not have a surge in your blood sugar after eating it.

Kidney friendly low sodium turkey sausage patties-3
Kidney friendly low sodium turkey sausage patties – great for diabetes and heart health

Ingredients in this recipe

  • Ground turkey: This recipe uses ground, skinless turkey breast. The skin of poultry has more fat, especially saturated fat, which can be a problem if your blood cholesterol is already high. Skinless turkey is a healthier option that provides you with a good source of protein, without the added cholesterol and saturated fat.
  • Spices: This recipe uses a variety of spices such as basil, sage, oregano, nutmeg and chili powder. If you want you can substitute these spices with the ones that you like and this recipe would still taste good.
  • Toppings: Add your favorite toppings to make this recipe even better. Try some chili sauce, pickled jalapenos, pickled cucumbers, or chimichurri sauce for enhanced flavor. 

How to make this recipe

Here are the steps to make this recipe:

  • Mix all the ingredients for the patties by hand or with a spoon in a medium bowl.
  • Shape the mixture into five patties.
  • Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat and lightly spray with cooking spray.
  • Place the patties on the hot skillet and cook for about 4-5 minutes or until the bottom of the patties is brown and the sides are crisp.
  • Flip the patties and cook for another 3-4 minutes or until the patties are no longer pink.
  • Remove the patties from the skillet and serve with your favorite breakfast items. You can also serve the patties in a wrap, a sandwich or use them in breakfast burritos.
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Kidney friendly low sodium turkey sausage patties for breakfast

How to store this recipe

Wrap the left-over sausage patties in plastic wrap or place them in an airtight container. These patties stay good for up to 3–4 days. Reheat in the microwave for 20–30 seconds at a time until they are warm enough.

Kidney friendly low sodium turkey sausage patties-featured

Kidney Friendly Low Potassium Turkey Sausage Patties

8f7236c9626d7dcca9cca39f75b7f03fArchana Singh, PhD
This Kidney Friendly Low Potassium Turkey Sausage Patties recipe is perfect for any stage of kidney disease. It is made from ground turkey and a variety of spices like oregano, chilli powder, pepper, basil, sage, nutmeg, and garlic.
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 5
Calories 111 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 12 oz skinless, ground turkey breast
  • 1 large egg white
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1/4 tsp dried basil, crumbled
  • 1/4 tsp dried sage
  • 1/4 tsp dried oregano, crumbled
  • 1/8 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp dried dillweed, crumbled
  • 1/8 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/8 tsp chili powder (optional)

Instructions
 

  • Mix all the ingredients for the patties by hand or with a spoon in a medium bowl.
  • Shape the mixture into five patties.
  • Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat and lightly spray with cooking spray.
  • Place the patties on the hot skillet and cook for about 4-5 minutes or until the bottom of the patties is brown and the sides are crisp.
  • Flip the patties and cook for another 3-4 minutes or until the patties are no longer pink.
  • Remove the patties from the skillet and serve with your favorite breakfast items. You can also serve the patties in a wrap, a sandwich or use them in breakfast burritos.

Nutrition

Calories: 111kcalCarbohydrates: 0.5gProtein: 16gFat: 5gSaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 44mgSodium: 175mgPotassium: 204mgPhosphorus: 129mg
Keyword Kidney Friendly, Low potassium
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

How much meat can you eat if you have kidney disease?

The amount of meat you can eat if you have kidney disease will depend on your stage of kidney disease and other demographic factors such as age, gender, height, weight, etc.

Current research suggests that a good way to manage kidney disease is to get half of your protein from plant-based sources and the rest from meat and animal-based protein sources.

Here is a general estimate of how much meat to consume on a 2000 calorie diet for different stages of kidney disease:

CKD stages 1 or 2: follow a low-protein diet and eat meat to get 25 grams of protein per day.

CKD stages 3, 4, and 5 (not on dialysis): protein intake is restricted during these stages. Limit your consumption of meat to get about 17.5 grams of protein per day.

Dialysis: patients on dialysis typically have an increased protein requirement. Consume a high protein diet and eat enough meat to get 45 grams of protein every day.

Again, this is a general guideline and your protein intake will vary based on your personal needs.

Other low potassium recipes

Low potassium low protein beet with arugula salad
Low sodium low potassium asparagus lemon pasta salad

Archana Singh, PhD

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