Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal With Mushroom | Kidney Friendly

This Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal is a nutritious, plant-based recipe that is full of umami flavor and great for kidney health and diabetes management. This wholesome dish combines the heartiness of rolled oats with the earthy flavors of garlic, ginger, and white mushrooms. With a touch of nutritional yeast for that delightful umami taste, it’s a recipe that will surely make your taste buds happy.

Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal - Kidney Friendly
Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal – Kidney Friendly

You must have eaten a countless number of sweet oats recipes, but this recipe will change your mind about eating just sweet oats and make you a fan of savory oats recipes.

Why is this a heart healthy recipe

Keeping your heart healthy is very important for managing your CKD. Make sure that you eat adequate amounts of fat (mostly monounsaturated fat) and that you limit your intake of foods that are high in saturated fat and dietary cholesterol.

There are 8 grams of total fat in each serving of this heart-healthy oatmeal recipe, which is considered a moderate amount of fat per serving. This recipe contains a modest amount of saturated fat; in fact, there is only 1 gram of saturated fat in each individual serving.

This recipe is high in monounsaturated fat, with 5 grams of monounsaturated fat per serving. This is good for your heart health, as monounsaturated fats can help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol level and lower the risk of coronary artery disease.

Being plant-based, this recipe doesn’t have any dietary cholesterol.

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Why is this a diabetes friendly recipe

This heart-healthy oatmeal is suitable for people with diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in each serving of this recipe is only 17 grams, which is not very much. Also, each serving has 3 grams of fiber, which is a good amount when you consider that each serving has only 16 grams of carbohydrates. Your blood sugar levels will stay steady after eating this recipe because it has few carbohydrates but a lot of fiber.

Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal - Diabetes Friendly
Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal – Great for diabetes and is heart healthy

Why is this a kidney friendly recipe

This plant-based, heart-healthy oatmeal recipe is low in protein, as there are only 5 grams of protein in each serving. Since all of the protein in this recipe comes from plants and not animals, your kidneys won’t have to work too hard to get rid of the waste products.

Each serving of this recipe has 180 mg of potassium, which is considered low for a serving. This is good if you are looking for low-potassium recipes to help you manage hyperkalemia.

There are 106 mg of phosphorus in every serving of this recipe, which is a moderate amount of phosphorus for a serving. Only 10–30% of this phosphorus will enter your body because it is all coming from plant-based sources. This means your body will get only 10–35 mg of phosphorus from this recipe.

This heart-healthy oatmeal recipe has only 21 mg of sodium per serving, which is low and great for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or high blood pressure. Managing your sodium intake is a crucial part of taking care of your kidneys. One way to ensure that you are not eating too much sodium is to always choose low-sodium alternatives when it comes to packaged foods.

To know whether or not a packaged food is low in sodium, check the nutrition claim on the packaging. If the packaging has any of the following nutrition claims, then the food is lower in sodium as compared to other similar foods:

  • Salt/Sodium-Free: Less than 5 mg of sodium per serving
  • Very Low Sodium: 35 mg of sodium or less per serving
  • Low Sodium: 140 mg of sodium or less per serving
  • Reduced Sodium: At least 25% less sodium than the regular product
  • Light in Sodium or Lightly Salted: At least 50% less sodium than the regular product
  • No-Salt-Added or Unsalted: No salt is added during processing, but these products may not be salt- or sodium-free unless stated

Another way to know the sodium content of a packaged food is to check the nutrition facts label. Avoid foods with a sodium content of 20% or more of the daily value per serving.

Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal - great for kidney disease
Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal – great for chronic kidney disease (CKD)

Ingredients

Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal - Ingredients health benefits
Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal – Ingredients health benefits

This savory heart-healthy oatmeal needs only a few ingredients, which are listed below:

  • Olive oil: I have used olive oil, but feel free to use any other oil that is readily available.
  • Garlic and ginger: Add a little bit of spicy but earthy flavor to this recipe.
  • Old-fashioned rolled oats: Rolled oats are high in fiber and are easier to cook than steel-cut oats. Oats are a great source of antioxidants called avenanthramides, which help lower blood pressure levels.
  • Fortified nutritional yeast: Adds a lot of umami flavor and a good dose of vitamin B12 to this plant-based recipe.
  • Other Seasonings (optional): Don’t be afraid to try this recipe with your favorite seasonings to give it a little bit more flavor. My favorite one to add is the Everything Bagel Seasoning. Just a sprinkle is enough!
Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal - ingredients
Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal – Ingredients
  • Mushrooms: Mushrooms are the only type of produce that can be a natural source of vitamin D. I have chosen white mushrooms, but you can use any kind of mushroom that you want. You will still get the same earthy, meaty, and umami flavor.
  • Low sodium vegetable broth: A low-sodium vegetable broth is a better option compared to a regular broth because it has lesser amounts of sodium. This is good if you want to manage hypertension, heart disease, or kidney disease.

How to make savory heart healthy oatmeal with mushroom

This kidney-friendly recipe is very simple and easy to make. Here are the steps to make this recipe:

  • Heat a small pot on medium heat. Add oil, garlic, and grated ginger to the pot. Sauté for 1-2 minutes.
  • Add chopped mushrooms to the pot and sauté for a few minutes, till mushrooms are tender and wilted.
  • Add vegetable broth to the pot. Turn the heat to medium-high and bring the broth to a boil.
  • Add rolled oats and nutritional yeast to the pot and give it a good stir to mix them well with the broth. Let the mixture come to a boil again. Then turn the heat down to medium-low.
  • Simmer and cook for another 5 minutes, or until the oats have absorbed the broth and are mushy. Add more broth if you like it a little runny. Serve hot.
Renal diet breakfast savory oatmeal with mushroom-6
Savory heart healthy oatmeal with mushroom in a bowl
Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal - Kidney Friendly- recipe card

Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal With Mushroom | Kidney Friendly

8f7236c9626d7dcca9cca39f75b7f03fArchana Singh, PhD
This Savory Heart Healthy Oatmeal with Mushroom is full of umami flavor and is great for kidney health, diabetes management, and heart health. It is made from rolled oats, mushrooms, olive oil, nutritional yeast, ginger, and garlic. It is super delicious and very easy to make.
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Course Breakfast, Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 2
Calories 158 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • 1/2 cup white mushroom, chopped
  • 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 tsp nutritional yeast

Instructions
 

  • Heat a small pot on medium heat. Add oil, garlic and grated ginger to the pot. Sauté for 1-2 minutes.
  • Add chopped mushrooms to the pot and sauté for a few minutes, till mushrooms are tender and wilted.
  • Add vegetable broth to the pot. Turn the heat to medium-high and bring the broth to a boil.
  • Add rolled oats and nutritional yeast to the pot and give it a good stir to mix it well with the broth. Let the mixture come to a boil again. Then turn the heat down to medium-low.
  • Simmer and cook for another 5 mintues or until the oats have absorbed the broth and are mushy. Add more broth if you like it a little runny. Serve hot.

Nutrition

Calories: 158kcalCarbohydrates: 17gProtein: 5gFat: 8gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 6gSodium: 21mgPotassium: 180mgFiber: 3gSugar: 1gPhosphorus: 106mg
Keyword Diabetes Friendly, Heart Healthy, Kidney Friendly
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Is whole grain good for kidney disease?

Patients with chronic kidney disease often avoid eating whole grains like wheat and oats because of the high levels of phosphorus and potassium that these foods contain. But the current diet recommendations for kidney disease say that whole grains can be part of a healthy kidney diet. 

This is because whole grains are good for your health in many ways, like keeping your bowel movements regular, lowering your blood cholesterol, and helping your body respond better to insulin. Keep in mind that the body does not readily absorb phosphorus from plant sources and that potassium intake does not necessarily need to be restricted for everyone.

What foods unblock clogged arteries

While certain foods are often associated with promoting heart health and reducing the risk of clogged arteries, it’s important to note that no single food can miraculously unblock arteries. However, a balanced and healthy diet can contribute to overall cardiovascular health and reduce the risk of further plaque buildup. Here are five foods that are generally considered beneficial for heart health:

Whole Grains: Whole grains like oats, brown rice, quinoa, and whole wheat products are high in fiber, which can help lower cholesterol levels and maintain a healthy weight.

Berries: Berries are rich in antioxidants, including anthocyanins, which have been linked to a lower risk of heart disease. Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries are excellent choices.

Fatty Fish: Fish such as salmon, mackerel, trout, and sardines are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can help lower triglyceride levels, reduce inflammation, and potentially improve artery health.

Leafy Greens: Vegetables like spinach, kale, and Swiss chard are packed with vitamins, minerals, and dietary nitrates, which have been associated with lower blood pressure and improved arterial function.

Nuts: Almonds, walnuts, pistachios, and other nuts contain heart-healthy fats, fiber, and antioxidants. Regular nut consumption has been linked to reduced cholesterol levels and a lower risk of heart disease.

Oatmeal and kidney disease

Oatmeal can be a nutritious option for individuals with kidney disease. Here is how the nutrients such as sodium, protein, potassium, and phosphorus in oatmeal can impact kidney health:

Sodium: Oatmeal, particularly when prepared with low-sodium ingredients, can be a beneficial choice for individuals with kidney disease. Sodium is an essential mineral that helps maintain fluid balance in the body. However, for those with kidney disease, impaired kidney function can lead to difficulty regulating sodium levels. Consuming excess sodium can cause fluid retention and elevate blood pressure, which can be detrimental to kidney health. By selecting low-sodium options, such as unsalted or low-sodium oatmeal, you can help manage your sodium intake and promote kidney health.

Protein: Oatmeal is generally considered a moderately protein-rich food when compared to other grains. For individuals with advanced stages of kidney disease, excessive protein intake can put strain on the kidneys and contribute to the buildup of waste products in the body. However, being plant-based, the protein waste generated from eating oatmeal is less taxing for the kidneys.

Potassium: Oatmeal naturally contains potassium, an essential mineral that plays a vital role in maintaining heart health, nerve function, and muscle contractions. However, for individuals with kidney disease, the kidneys may struggle to eliminate excess potassium from the body, leading to elevated levels in the blood, a condition known as hyperkalemia. Depending on the severity of your kidney disease, your healthcare professional may recommend limiting your potassium intake. Choosing lower-potassium toppings for your oatmeal, such as fresh berries instead of potassium-rich bananas, can help you manage your potassium levels while still enjoying this nutritious breakfast option.

Phosphorus: Oatmeal is relatively low in phosphorus compared to other grains and protein sources. Phosphorus is a mineral that works in tandem with calcium to support bone health and other bodily functions. However, in kidney disease, the kidneys may struggle to effectively filter and eliminate excess phosphorus from the blood, leading to high phosphorus levels, known as hyperphosphatemia. Elevated phosphorus levels can contribute to mineral imbalances and bone problems. Opting for plain oatmeal without phosphorus-rich additives, such as nuts or chocolate, can help you moderate your phosphorus intake and support kidney health.

Archana Singh, PhD

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