Stage 3 Kidney Disease Sample Diet And Meal Plan

A Stage 3 Kidney Disease Sample Diet And Meal Plan typically focuses on lowering sodium, potassium, and protein intake to ease the load on compromised kidneys. It’s a dietary plan designed to maintain overall health and slow down disease progression.

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Stage 3 Kidney Disease Sample Diet And Meal Plan

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 indicates moderate kidney damage, but it is manageable with the right dietary changes. A well-balanced diet can help reduce strain on the kidneys, thus slowing disease progression and improving overall health.

Diet for stage 3 kidney disease

A stage 3 kidney disease diet plays a critical role in supporting kidney health and managing the condition effectively. It typically focuses on maintaining a balance of nutrients while taking into account the specific needs and limitations associated with impaired kidney function. Controlling how much protein, sodium, phosphorus, and potassium you eat is often part of this kind of diet

Consuming lower amounts of protein in stage 3 kidney disease is recommended because it helps reduce the workload on the kidneys. The second nutrient that you should pay attention to is your sodium intake, as sodium can help you manage your blood pressure and fluid balance. 

Paying attention to your phosphorus intake also becomes crucial at this stage. This is because phosphorus can accumulate in the bloodstream, which can have a detrimental effect on bone health. Additionally, you also need to watch your potassium consumption. As kidney function declines, potassium levels can be too high in the blood, leading to hyperkalemia, which can cause severe heart problems.

A stage 3 kidney disease diet should emphasize incorporating wholesome foods such as lean proteins, low-potassium fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and healthy fats. Below are some healthy recipes that can help you manage stage 3 kidney disease:

Healthy recipes for stage 3 kidney disease sample diet
Turkey Sausage Patties
White Beans Tuna Salad
Healthy Beans Turkey Chili
Thai Basil Eggplant

How much potassium per day for stage 3 kidney disease

The recommended potassium intake for individuals with stage 3 kidney disease can vary depending on individual factors such as lab results, medications, and overall health conditions. While some individuals may need to limit their potassium intake, others may not require such restrictions.

Potassium restrictions are typically recommended when blood potassium levels are elevated (hyperkalemia). If you have hyperkalemia, it is recommended that you keep your potassium consumption to less than 3000 mg per day, typically in the range of about 2,000 to 2500 milligrams per day. Limit your consumption of high-potassium foods like bananas, oranges, potatoes, tomatoes, spinach, etc. to keep your serum potassium levels within the recommended range of 3.5 to 5.0 mmol/L

If you don’t have hyperkalemia, you can consume up to 4700 mg of potassium every day. Consuming a high-potassium diet can be especially beneficial if you have high blood pressure or hypertension. Potassium plays a significant role in regulating blood pressure levels. It helps counteract the effects of sodium, a mineral that can raise blood pressure. Potassium helps relax the walls of blood vessels, promoting vasodilation and improving blood flow. When potassium intake is adequate, it can help lower blood pressure by balancing sodium levels and reducing the constriction of blood vessels.

How much protein is needed for ckd stage 3

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) suggests a protein intake of 0.6 to 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day for individuals with stage 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD). Keep in mind, though, that protein intake for individuals with stage 3 CKD can vary depending on individual factors such as kidney function, age, body weight, and overall health status. Generally, a lower protein intake is advised to lessen the burden on the kidneys while still meeting nutritional needs.

It’s also important to focus on eating high-quality protein sources, such as lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, and plant-based proteins like tofu and legumes. People with kidney disease should spread out their protein intake throughout the day and keep an eye on their phosphorus levels, since phosphorus is often found in foods high in protein and can build up in the blood.

How much phosphorus per day for stage 3 kidney disease

In stage 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD), monitoring phosphorus intake is important as impaired kidney function can lead to difficulties in properly excreting phosphorus from the body. Elevated phosphorus levels in the blood, known as hyperphosphatemia, can contribute to various complications, including bone and cardiovascular issues.

The recommended phosphorus intake for individuals with stage 3 kidney disease can vary based on individual factors, such as blood test results, kidney function, and other health conditions. Generally, a moderate restriction of dietary phosphorus is advised, aiming for around 800-1,000 milligrams (mg) per day. This involves limiting high-phosphorus foods such as processed meats, dairy products, nuts, seeds, and colas.

Moreover, phosphate binders may be prescribed to help control phosphorus levels by binding to dietary phosphorus and preventing its absorption. Following the recommended dietary guidelines, taking prescribed medications, and regular monitoring of phosphorus levels can all contribute to effectively managing phosphorus intake in stage 3 CKD.

Sodium intake for ckd stage 3

The recommended sodium intake for individuals with stage 3 kidney disease (CKD) is typically around 1,500 milligrams (mg) per day. Sodium, commonly found in table salt and processed foods, can contribute to fluid retention and increase blood pressure, putting additional strain on the kidneys.

Reducing sodium intake can help manage blood pressure and fluid balance, which are crucial for individuals with kidney disease. To achieve a lower sodium intake, it is advisable to limit the consumption of processed and packaged foods, fast food, canned soups, and salty snacks. Instead, focus on fresh, whole foods and use herbs, spices, lemon juice, and vinegar to add flavor to meals without relying on excessive salt.

potassium protein sodium phosphorus for ckd stage 3
Stage 3 kidney disease daily recommended intake of nutrients

What foods are good for stage 3 kidney disease

When managing stage 3 kidney disease, it is important to focus on a balanced and kidney-friendly diet. Here are some foods that are generally considered good for individuals with stage 3 kidney disease:

Low-potassium fruits

Fruits such as apples, berries, grapes, peaches, and pineapples are low in potassium, making them suitable choices for those with kidney issues. These fruits offer a range of health benefits while helping to maintain optimal potassium levels in the body. They provide a refreshing burst of natural sweetness and are rich in vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber. These fruits can be enjoyed fresh, added to salads, blended into smoothies, or used as toppings for cereal or yogurt.

Low-potassium vegetables

Low-potassium vegetables are an essential part of a kidney-friendly diet, particularly for individuals with kidney disease or those needing to manage their potassium intake. These vegetables offer a wide array of nutrients, vitamins, and dietary fiber while providing minimal potassium content.

Some examples of low-potassium vegetables include green beans, carrots, cauliflower, cabbage, and lettuce. These vegetables are beneficial not only for their low potassium content but also for their versatility in various culinary preparations. They can be enjoyed raw in salads, steamed, roasted, stir-fried, or added to soups and stews. Incorporating low-potassium vegetables into the diet helps maintain a balanced potassium level, supports kidney health, and contributes to a well-rounded and nutritious meal plan.

Lean proteins

Lean proteins play a crucial role in the diet of individuals with kidney disease. They provide essential amino acids for tissue repair, maintenance, and overall health while minimizing the strain on the kidneys. Lean proteins are typically lower in fat and cholesterol, making them a healthier choice for individuals with kidney disease who may also have other health conditions such as diabetes or cardiovascular issues. 

Examples of lean proteins include skinless poultry, such as chicken and turkey breast, fish like salmon and cod, eggs, and tofu. Incorporating these lean protein sources into the diet offers numerous benefits, including promoting muscle health, supporting immune function, and helping to maintain a healthy weight. The recommended amount of lean protein intake can vary depending on individual factors such as body weight, kidney function, and other dietary considerations.

Whole grains

Incorporating whole grains into the diet of individuals with stage 3 kidney disease can provide several health benefits. Whole grains are nutrient-rich, high in dietary fiber, and offer a variety of vitamins and minerals. They contribute to improved digestive health, help maintain stable blood sugar levels, and support heart health. Examples of whole grains include brown rice, whole wheat bread, quinoa, oats, barley, and bulgur. These grains can be enjoyed in a variety of dishes, such as salads, side dishes, or as a base for stir-fries.

It is important to keep in mind that whole grains contain more potassium and phosphorus as compared to refined foods. However, phosphorus from plant-based foods like whole grains might not be of great concern because plant-based phosphorus is not as readily absorbed in the body as phosphorus from animal products.

Dairy

When it comes to dairy consumption for individuals with stage 3 kidney disease, the key lies in moderation and choosing the right kind of dairy product. Dairy is high in vital nutrients like calcium and vitamin D, but it can also contain high levels of phosphorus and potassium, which could be problematic for kidneys that aren’t functioning optimally.

There isn’t a one-size-fits-all recommendation for dairy consumption in stage 3 kidney disease. The amount of dairy you can consume will depend on your overall health, nutritional status, and lab results. However, if you enjoy dairy, here are some general tips:

  1. Opt for smaller portions: Instead of a full glass of milk, you might have a half-cup.
  2. Choose lower-phosphorus dairy options: Not all dairy products are created equal. For instance, cream cheese, ricotta, and brie usually have less phosphorus than other cheeses.
  3. Consider dairy alternatives: Many people with kidney disease find that plant-based milk substitutes like almond milk or rice milk are a good alternative because they tend to be lower in potassium and phosphorus than traditional dairy milk.

Healthy Fats

Eating healthy fats when you have stage 3 kidney disease can be beneficial for your overall health and well-being. Healthy fats provide essential fatty acids, help absorb fat-soluble vitamins, and contribute to satiety and flavor in meals. Examples of healthy fats include sources like avocados, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and fatty fish like salmon and mackerel. These fats are rich in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which have been associated with improved heart health and reduced inflammation. 

When it comes to the amount of healthy fats to consume with kidney disease, portion control is important due to their high calorie content. It is recommended to incorporate these healthy fats in moderation and be mindful of total calorie intake to maintain a healthy weight. 

Low-Sodium foods

High sodium intake can contribute to fluid retention, elevated blood pressure, and increased strain on the kidneys. Choosing low-sodium foods can help manage blood pressure and fluid balance, reducing the workload on the kidneys and minimizing the risk of further kidney damage. Low-sodium foods also promote heart health and can assist in managing other conditions commonly associated with kidney disease, such as hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

Examples of low-sodium foods include fresh fruits and vegetables, which are naturally low in sodium. Additionally, whole grains like brown rice, quinoa, and oats, as well as lean proteins like skinless chicken, turkey, and fish, are also typically low in sodium.

Other low-sodium options include herbs, spices, and vinegar, which can be used to add flavor to meals without relying on excessive salt. It’s important to read food labels and choose products labeled as low-sodium or sodium-free when shopping for packaged or processed foods, as these items are specifically formulated to contain reduced amounts of sodium.

Low phosphorus foods

Low-phosphorus foods help manage phosphorus levels in the blood, which is crucial as impaired kidney function can lead to difficulty excreting phosphorus properly. Elevated phosphorus levels, known as hyperphosphatemia, can contribute to complications such as bone disease and cardiovascular issues. By choosing low-phosphorus foods, individuals can help prevent the buildup of phosphorus in the bloodstream. 

Examples of low-phosphorus foods include green beans, carrots, cauliflower, cabbage, lettuce, apples, berries, grapes, peaches, and pineapples. These foods are nutrient-rich and provide vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber while being lower in phosphorus content.

foods good for ckd stage 3
Foods good for stage 3 kidney disease

Foods to avoid with stage 3 kidney disease

When managing stage 3 kidney disease, it is important to be aware of foods that are high in potassium, phosphorus, and sodium, as well as those that can negatively impact kidney function. While individual dietary restrictions may vary, here are some general foods to limit or avoid:

  • High-potassium foods: If you have hyperkalemia, limit high-potassium foods like bananas, oranges, potatoes, tomatoes, avocados, spinach, and dried fruits. These foods can further increase potassium levels in the blood, which can be harmful to kidney function.
  • High-phosphorus foods: Restrict high-phosphorus foods such as dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt), processed meats, and organ meats. Excessive phosphorus intake can contribute to mineral imbalances and further kidney damage.
  • High-sodium foods: Reduce sodium intake by avoiding processed and packaged foods, fast food, canned soups, deli meats, and salty snacks. High sodium intake can lead to fluid retention and increased blood pressure, placing additional strain on the kidneys.
  • Foods with added sugars: Limit foods and beverages with added sugars, such as sodas, candies, pastries, and sugary cereals. High sugar intake can contribute to weight gain and an increased risk of diabetes, which can worsen kidney disease.
  • Alcoholic beverages: Alcohol can be taxing on the kidneys and may worsen existing kidney damage. It is advisable to limit or avoid alcohol consumption.
foods to avoid with ckd stage 3
Foods to avoid or limit with CKD stage 3

What is a good breakfast for stage 3 kidney disease

A good breakfast for individuals with stage 3 kidney disease should focus on low-potassium, low-phosphorus, and kidney-friendly foods. Here’s a sample breakfast idea:

  • Egg white omelet: Prepare an omelet using egg whites, diced vegetables (such as bell peppers, onions, and spinach), and a sprinkle of low-sodium herbs or spices for flavor.
  • Whole wheat toast: Enjoy a slice of whole wheat toast topped with a small amount of low-sodium homemade avocado spread.
  • Fresh fruit salad: Create a refreshing fruit salad using low-potassium fruits like sliced apples, berries, and grapes.
  • Low-phosphorus dairy alternative: Consider incorporating a low-phosphorus dairy alternative, such as almond milk or rice milk, into your breakfast for added variety.

What is a good lunch/dinner for stage 3 kidney disease

It is important to choose a balance of lean protein, low-potassium vegetables, and whole grains while also considering portion sizes and limiting sodium intake. Including a variety of flavors and textures can make meals more enjoyable and satisfying. Here’s an example of a stage 3 kidney disease lunch idea:

Grilled salmon with lemon-dill sauce, served with quinoa and roasted vegetables: Grill a small salmon filet seasoned with herbs and spices and top it with a homemade lemon-dill sauce made with low-phosphorus ingredients. Serve the salmon alongside cooked quinoa, a protein-rich grain, and a medley of low-potassium roasted vegetables like bell peppers, zucchini, and cauliflower. This meal is not only kidney-friendly but also provides a good balance of nutrients, including essential fatty acids, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

Stage 3 kidney disease sample diet

Here’s a sample diet that may be suitable for individuals with stage 3 kidney disease:

  • Protein:
    1. Include moderate amounts of high-quality protein sources such as skinless turkey, skinless chicken, fish, eggs, and tofu.
    2. Limit protein intake based on your daily recommended intake to reduce strain on the kidneys.

  • Fruits and Vegetables:
    1. Consume a variety of fruits and vegetables to obtain essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.
    2. Be mindful of fruits and vegetables that are high in potassium if you have hyperkalemia. Examples of lower-potassium fruits include apples, berries, grapes, and peaches. Lower-potassium vegetables include green beans, carrots, cauliflower, and cabbage.

  • Grains:
    1. Choose whole grains like brown rice, whole wheat bread, and whole grain pasta over refined grains to increase fiber intake.
    2. Monitor the portion sizes of grains to manage phosphorus and potassium intake.

  • Dairy and Alternatives:
    1. Choose low-fat or skim dairy products such as milk, yogurt, and cheese.
    2. Consider alternatives like almond milk or rice milk that are free of potassium and phosphorus additives.

  • Fats:
    1. Opt for healthy fats, such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts, in moderation.
    2. Limit saturated and trans fats found in fried foods, processed snacks, and fatty meats.

  • Fluids:
    1. Follow your healthcare provider’s recommendations regarding fluid intake, as this can vary depending on individual needs.
    2. Be mindful of your fluid intake if you are advised to limit it.

  • Sodium and Phosphorus:
    1. Limit sodium intake by avoiding processed and packaged foods, fast food, and using herbs and spices to season meals instead of salt.
    2. Restrict phosphorus intake by avoiding high-phosphorus foods like processed meats, dairy products, baked goods, and colas.
stage 3 kidney disease sample diet and meal plan
Stage 3 kidney disease sample diet and meal plan

Stage 3 kidney disease meal plan

Breakfast: Oatmeal

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon

Instructions

  • Place the water and milk in a small pot and bring them to a boil.
  • Lower the heat to a simmer and add the oats. Allow the oats to cook while giving them an occasional stir, until they become tender and have soaked up the majority of the fluid – this should take roughly 5 minutes.
  • Take the saucepan off the heat, cover it and leave it to sit for a period of 2-3 minutes.
  • Stir in maple syrup and cinnamon. Let rest for a few minutes to cool. Thin with a little more water, if desired. Serve warm.

Nutrition: Calories: 240, Fat: 7 g, Carbs: 38 g, Protein: 9 g, Sodium: 59 mg, Potassium: 320 mg, Phosphorus: 274 mg

Snack: 3 Plain brown rice crackers

Nutrition: Calories: 105, Fat: .75 g, Carbs: g, Protein: 2 g, Sodium: 45 mg, Potassium: 78 mg, Phosphorus: 97 mg

Lunch: Chickpea and Pasta Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cooked whole wheat pasta (preferably a smaller shape, like shells or fusilli)
  • 1/2 cup canned, low-sodium chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup raw spinach
  • 1 medium carrot, peeled and shredded
  • 1/4 cup diced cucumber
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 clove peeled and minced garlic (optional)
  • Salt and pepper to taste (keep sodium levels in mind)

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the cooked pasta, chickpeas, spinach, shredded carrot, and diced cucumber.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, minced garlic, and apple cider vinegar. Season lightly with salt and pepper, to taste.
  3. Drizzle the dressing over the salad and toss well to combine.
  4. Serve immediately, or refrigerate to let the flavors meld together.

Nutrition: Calories: 476, Fat: 18 g, Carbs: 68 g, Protein: 15 g, Sodium: 361 mg, Potassium: 611 mg, Phosphorus: 284 mg

Snack: 1 small apple and 1 tbsp peanut butter

Nutrition: Calories: 140, Fat: 8 g, Carbs: 16 g, Protein: 4 g, Sodium: 33 mg, Potassium: 210 mg, Phosphorus: 59 mg

Dinner: Grilled chicken sandwich with house salad

Ingredients (grilled chicken sanwich)

  • 1 oz chicken breast, grilled
  • 2 slices of whole grain bread, low sodium
  • 1 tablespoon of low-fat mayonnaise, low sodium
  • 1 large leaf of romaine lettuce
  • 2 thin slices of a tomato

Instructions (grilled chicken sandwich)

  • Spread the low-fat mayo evenly on one side of each slice of bread.
  • Place the grilled chicken breast on one slice of bread.
  • Top the chicken with the lettuce and tomato.
  • Close the sandwich with the second slice of bread, mayo-side down.
  • Cut in half if desired and serve.

Nutrition: Calories: 308, Fat: 7 g, Carbs: 41 g, Protein: 20 g, Sodium: 157 mg, Potassium: 500 mg, Phosphorus: 259 mg

Ingredients (house salad)

  • 2 cups of mixed salad greens
  • 1/4 cup of cherry tomatoes
  • 1/4 of a cucumber, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon of balsamic vinaigrette
  • 1/2 tsp olive oil
  • a pinch of pepper
  • a pinch of salt

Instructions (house salad)

  • In a large bowl, combine the salad greens, cherry tomatoes, and cucumber slices.
  • Drizzle the salad with the balsamic vinaigrette, olive oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine.
  • Serve the salad alongside the sandwich.

Nutrition: Calories: 122, Fat: 11 g, Carbs: 7 g, Protein: 1 g, Sodium: 161 mg, Potassium: 285 mg, Phosphorus: 39 mg

Stage 3 kidney disease diet meal plan recipe card image

Stage 3 Kidney Disease Sample Diet And Meal Plan

8f7236c9626d7dcca9cca39f75b7f03fArchana Singh, PhD
Stage 3 Kidney Disease Sample Diet And Meal Plan typically focuses on lowering sodium, potassium, and protein intake to ease the load on compromised kidneys. Here, you will find information about how much of these nutrients you should eat daily to slow down the progression of your kidney disease. You will also learn about the food that you can eat and the ones you should avoid at this stage.
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 0 minutes
Cook Time 0 minutes
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 1

Ingredients
  

  • 1/2 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 3 brown rice crackers
  • 1 cup whole wheat pasta cooked
  • 1/2 cup low-sodium, canned chickpeas drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup spinach
  • 1 medium carrot peeled and shredded
  • 1/4 cup cucumber diced 
  • 1 tbsp  olive oil
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 clove garlic peeled and minced
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch black pepper
  • 1 small apple
  • 1 tbsp peanut butter
  • 1 oz chicken breast grilled
  • 2 slices whole grain bread low sodium
  • 1 tbsp low-fat mayonnaise, low sodium
  • 1 large romaine lettuce
  • 2 slices tomato
  • cups mixed salad greens
  • 1/4 cup cherry tomatoes halved
  • 1/4 cucumber sliced
  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinaigrette
  • 1/2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch black pepper

Instructions
 

  • Breakfast: Oatmeal
    1. Place the water and milk in a small pot and bring them to a boil.
    2. Lower the heat to a simmer and add the oats. Allow the oats to cook while giving them an occasional stir, until they become tender and have soaked up the majority of the fluid – this should take roughly 5 minutes.
    3. Take the saucepan off the heat, cover it and leave it to sit for a period of 2-3 minutes.
    4. Stir in maple syrup and cinnamon. Let rest for a few minutes to cool. Thin with a little more water, if desired. Serve warm.
  • Snack: 3 Plain brown rice crackers
  • Lunch: Chickpea and Pasta Salad
    1. In a large bowl, combine the cooked pasta, chickpeas, spinach, shredded carrot, and diced cucumber.
    2. In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, minced garlic, and apple cider vinegar. Season lightly with salt and pepper, to taste.
    3. Drizzle the dressing over the salad and toss well to combine.
    4. Serve immediately, or refrigerate to let the flavors meld together.
  • Snack: 1 small apple and 1 tbsp peanut butter
  • Dinner: Grilled chicken sandwich with house salad
    Instructions for grilled chicken sandwich
    1. Spread the low-fat mayo evenly on one side of each slice of bread.
    2. Place the grilled chicken breast on one slice of bread.
    3. Top the chicken with the lettuce and tomato.
    4. Close the sandwich with the second slice of bread, mayo-side down.
    5. Cut in half if desired and serve.
    Instructions for house salad
    1. In a large bowl, combine the salad greens, cherry tomatoes, and cucumber slices.
    2. Drizzle the salad with the balsamic vinaigrette, olive oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine.
    3. Serve the salad alongside the sandwich.
Keyword Kidney Friendly, Stage 3 kidney disease diet, Stage 3 kidney disease meal plan
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
Archana Singh, PhD

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